TUKS

The TUKS project aimed to understand the experience of siblings having a brother or sister with autism and how siblings cope with challenges in their life. The project adopted a cross-cultural viewpoint, exploring whether young people in the UK and in Taiwan have different experiences and responses to have a sibling with autism. What did…

Employers’ survey

This recently-completed study was a response to the career prospects of adults with autism, which are currently very poor. This is the subject of a major National Autistic Society campaign at the moment. It is obvious that employers play an essential role in offering a job. However, employers’ attitudes to people with autism may not always be…

Déjà-vu at IMFAR 2017

I’m back in the office after my usual annual pilgimage to the International Meeting for Autism Research (aka IMFAR) which took place this year in San Francisco. As usual, it was inspiring to be among so many researchers and, increasingly, autistic people (including autistic researchers, of course) gathered together to share their work. The quality of debate…

Think you’re your own harshest critic? Try peer review…

This month’s blog is written by me with Duncan Astle, a colleague whose intellectual brilliance is only exceeded by his charm. Peer review is a lynch-pin of the scientific process and bookends every scientific project. But despite the crucial importance of the peer review process in determining what research gets funded and published, in our experience PhD students and…

Phoning it in: are AAC Researchers and Practitioners Keeping up to Date with Recent Research Developments?

This is a guest blog from DART collaborator Noreen Murphy.  You can find out more about Noreen’s project on AAC support and autism at this page. Technology continues to develop at a pace that shows no sign of slowing anytime soon. The field of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) for children on the autism spectrum is no exception.…