INSAR 2019 virtual symposium

In the middle of 2018, a group of academics came together, with the realisation that we were all, separately, contributing to a new way of thinking about autism. In various ways we had – implicitly or explicitly – developed a quantiative and experimental test of the predictions of the Double Empathy Problem.

We collected our studies together and sent them in to the International Society for Autism Research, hoping for the opportunity to present our work in a symposium at the 2019 conference in Montreal. Unfortunately our symposium submission was not successful, but the authors of three of the submitted abstracts chose to present their work, individually (not within a symposium), at the conference. This is because INSAR offers abstracts submitted as part of an unsuccessful symposium the chance to be presented individually, as either a poster or a non-symposium spoken presentation.

The purpose of this Library post is to bring together those three abstracts, together with the over-arching symposium pitch, so that people attending #INSAR2019 can attempt to see all three and get a glimpse of the symposium experience we had in mind when we submitted. After the conference, we’ll be supplementing this initial post with more information from our Discussant, Damian Milton, and a podcast featuring the different authors and presenters in conversation.

tl:dr – if you’re at INSAR 2019 you need to see Catherine’s poster on Thursday morning, and at the same time, Kerrianne’s poster also on Thursday morning, and then Brett’s talk on Friday afternoon. But please read more below if you want to find out why we’ve created this post, and see the abstracts we submitted.

Autism – a new book by Sue Fletcher-Watson & Francesca Happé

  We’re delighted to share details of this new (published February 2019) book, jointly written by me, Sue Fletcher-Watson and Professor Francesca Happé of King’s College London. About the Book: Here’s the official blurb: This new edition of Happé’s best-selling textbook provides a concise overview of contemporary psychological theories about autism. Using a ‘levels of…

Autism on Screen

DART researchers recently collaborated on a project investigating the accuracy of portrayals of autism on TV and film. The final article in Psychiatry Research is available here and we also wrote a letter to the editor on the topic, now published in Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders You can also see the perspective of…